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How To Crochet Along Edge Tutorial

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Wondering how to crochet along edge when the edge is the side of the rows. Or how about how to crochet evenly around a crocheted item, or even a knit one? You’re not alone. So many patterns include instructions to make a certain number of stitches “evenly in edge of work”, or something similar. Most of the time the number of rows you have to work into and the number of stitches you have to work do not go together easily. This free written and video tutorial will make borders and edges simple.

Supplies for this tutorial were provided by WeCrochet and Furls Fiberarts. All opinions are my own.

A green "L" shaped piece of crochet with a yellow border then a blue border on an orange vertical rectangular background. On the top right is text "easy start to crochet borders & edges with videos." Text at the bottom reads "Jessie At Home dot com."

Need to know how to add a crochet border to a knit or crochet blanket? This is the easy to follow tutorial for you. With step by step photos and instructions and right handed and left handed video tutorials you are sure to succeed. Now instead of just putting borders on granny squares or other items crocheted in the round, you will be able to add borders to C2C, post stitch, knit, and blankets of all sorts of stitches. What a lovely and professional looking finishing touch!

Yellow vertical rectangle with a series of process photos of crochet laying fanned from top left to bottom right. Last photo is fully visible and is a green crocheted "L" shaped with a crochet hook laying on top. On the top right are two small square pieces of paper with some measurements and math in pencil. On the top right corner of the yellow rectangle is text "how to", on the bottom right is text "start a crochet border." Text at the bottom reads "Jessie At Home dot com."

Your crochet pattern reads “crochet evenly in edge” and you have no idea how to make that happen. How do you put 75 stitches in 107 rows on the side of the blanket? What do you do?! Look not further, this tutorial has you covered. With written instructions, step by step photos, and a video tutorial, soon you’ll find crochet edges and borders simple.

How To Crochet Along Edge Video

RIGHT Handed

If you can’t see this video, try watching it on YouTube HERE.

LEFT Handed

If you can’t see this video, try watching it on YouTube HERE.

Supplies In Videos & Photos

Vibrant green vertical rectangle. At an angle across the middle is a photo of two whit hands crocheting a border on an orange crochet square with a Furls crochet hook. There's a stitch marker on the crochet. Above the image is text "Crochet evenly in edge" and "Secrets". Below the image is text "right and left handed video tutorials" and a purple arrow pointing to the image. Text at the bottom reads "Jessie At Home dot com."

How To Crochet Along Edge Tutorial

Stitches and Abbreviations

Click on highlighted sts for tutorials.

  • ch – chain
  • rnd – round
  • sc – single crochet
  • sc2tog – single crochet two together
  • sl st – slip stitch
  • sp(s) – space(s)
  • st(s) – stitch(es)

Math – Finding Your Numbers

If you are using a pattern or tutorial, you may already have the numbers you need. However, if you are not working from a pattern, you may need to find your own numbers. So I will show you how to start, even without a pattern.

In this tutorial, I’m teaching you how to make a base row or round in a single crochet stitch, though you can easily use this same technique for half double or double crochet. The sample piece I have used in the photos is an “L” shape made in double crochet stitches.

First, we need to find out how many stitches per inch. To do that we must measure across 4″ and count how many stitches are in those 4″. Be sure to use whole numbers in this step. In my sample I have 14 stitches in 4 inches. Always count your stitches in at least 4″, and be sure to start and end at least 1″ from the edges of your piece.

If you do not have a section in the piece that you are adding a border to, you will need to make a swatch in single crochet that is at least 6″ across and at least 3″ tall. Measure your gauge in the swatch.

A white square plastic gauge ruler with a 4 inch square opening inside. The ruler is on top of a green piece of crochet that goes across the bottom and up the right side of the photo. Under the crochet is a piece of paper with hand written "4 inches = 14 stitches"

If you are a member of Showstopper Creations, you will find a PDF cheat sheet with all the formulas and space for notes that you can print out and fill in each time you need to make a border.

Now comes the math. Number of stitches divided by number of inches will give you your stitches per inch. Do not round this number. I have 14 stitches in 4 inches, and 14/4 = 3.5. Therefor I have 3.5 stitches per inch.

Now measure the length of all the edges you need to add a border to where you are not putting in one stitch in every stitch. You can see what I mean in the photo below. On my vertical lines I measured the crochet shape and wrote in my measurements, using decimals as needed.

On my horizontal lines (those where I am adding the border on the top or bottom of my rows) I have written in the stitch counts. If I had used some sort of stitch pattern that didn’t line up 1 for 1 with my border, I would have to measure the tops and bottoms as well.

Finally I have taken the measurements in inches and multiplied them by the number of stitches per inch (3.5) to find the number of stitches on each edge. This number will need to be rounded to a whole number. Now that I know how many stitches I need in each edge, I can get my yarn and crochet hook and start my single crochet border.

Square piece of paper with measurements and math on it, a green piece of crochet on the side.

Step by Step Instructions With Photos

We’re going to start with the longest side, where we are stitching in the sides of the rows. According to my math, I need to place 38 sc in this side. One way to help get those stitches spaced evenly is to divide the side and the stitches by the same number.

So, what I did was fold the piece in half and place a stitch marker, then I folded each of those halves in half and place stitch markers. As you can see, this divided my piece into 4. So that means I needed to divide my number of stitches into 4 as well.

An "L" shape made of green crochet on its side. On the long side are 3 stitch marker dividing it in fourths.

38/4 = 9.5, or 9 remainder 2.

Now I needed to place 9 stitches in each of the 4 sections, and work in 2 more somewhere. You can see on the paper in the photo below that I choose to place 10 sts in my first quarter, 9 sts in each of the next two, and 10 sts in the last.

If you have a super long edge, you can divided it into more than 4 parts. The important thing to remember is each part needs to be exactly the same length, and you need to then divide the total number of stitches into the same number as there are parts.

You can also divide by a measurement. So you could place a stitch marker every 4 inches, then work however many stitches were in your 4 inch gauge. You may have to do a little more math for the last section if your edge measurement is not a multiple of 4.

A green rectangular piece of crochet that continues off the left of the image. On the top of the part we can see are 2 stitch markers and a crochet hook about a third of the way across making a border. The crochet sits on a small square piece of paper with some math on it.

Once you have reached your next corner, it’s time to rotate to the next side. For sc I simply ch 2, for hdc I (hdc, ch 2, hdc) in the corner, and for dc I (2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc) in the corner. Please note this is NOT going to be the same corner treatment as for any following rounds, this is only for your first row or round.

An "L" shape made of green crochet on its side. The long edge is on top and at the top left corner is a crochet hook attached to the unfinished border.

Now we have the bottom of our piece. In this case I just place one sc in the bottom loop of my first row. Then repeat the corner.

An "L" shape made of green crochet upside down. The bottom of the "L" is on top and at the top left corner is a crochet hook attached to the unfinished border.

For this super short edge, I only needed 9 stitches, so I didn’t need any markers. Then corner time.

A green rectangular piece of crochet that continues off the bottom of the image. At the top left corner is a crochet hook attached to the unfinished border.

Next I had an edge that was worked evenly one stitch to one stitch, on top of my dc stitches. However, this edge ends with and inside corner, so I needed to account for that. To do that I made a sc2tog at the very end.

An "L" shape made of green crochet. In the inside corner where the two lines that make the "L" meet a crochet hook attached to the unfinished border.

The next edge was long enough to need to be divided in fourths, so I did so with both the edge and the number of stitches. I needed 29 stitches and 29/4 is 7 remainder 1. So I planned for 7, 7, 7, 8 stitches in the 4 sections. For the first stitch of the edge I made a sc2tog. That meant that in the fist section I made: sc2tog followed by 5 more sc in place of 7 sc.

An "L" shape made of green crochet with the long edge at the bottom. On the top of the long edge we can see are 3 stitch markers and a crochet hook about a fourth of the way across making a border.

In each of the next 2 quarters I made 7 sc, and in the last quarter I made 8 sc. Then it was corner time again.

An "L" shape made of green crochet with the long edge at the bottom. At the top left corner of the long edge is a crochet hook attached to the unfinished border.

Finally I placed one sc in each of the 9 sts across the top, and made the last ch 2 corner.

A green rectangular piece of crochet that continues off the bottom of the image. At the top left corner is a crochet hook attached to the last stitch of the border.

To finish the first round of the border, I sl st to the first sc.

Then I made another round in yellow, and another in blue. For each of these round I worked 1 sc in every sc with the exception of the inside corner. There I made a sc2tog at the end of the side before the corner, and a sc2tog at the start of the side after the corner. In each ch 2 I placed (sc, ch 2, sc).

Three images nest to each other. First is a green "L" shaped piece of crochet with a white and silver Furls crochet hook laying on top of it. On the right above the bottom of the "L" are two small square pieces of paper with some measurements and math in pencil. Second is the same green crochet "L" with a yellow border, then last is the same green crochet "L" with a yellow border then a blue border.

There you have it, a basic blueprint to help with borders.

FAQs

How do I make sure my stitches are evenly spaced?

Divide the piece you are crocheting into and the number of stitches you are placing in that piece into the same number of pieces. Make sure those pieces are even either by folding or measuring.

Can I use this to crochet a border on knitting or even on fabric or something else?

Yes! Divide your edges up in the same manner and get crocheting.

What if my piece is round or curved?

This still works! I would be sure to use sc for your first row or round. Measure carefully with a sewing measuring tape (not a stiff one) and take care to measure the exact edge. You may find that on some outside curves you have to place stitches very close together, and on some inside curves you have to place them farther apart.

If you try using a taller stitch you will need to adjust your numbers due to the measurements at the tops of the stitches being different than those at the bottom. That’s just how curves work, geometry can get tricky!

Square Patterns

You will find some of the Stitchopedia tutorials contain patterns at the end for 6 and/or 12 inch squares to practice. They all end with a border so they can be joined together to make a sampler blanket. This is a great way to practice your skills.

A purple vertical rectangle. At an angle across the top half is a photo of a green crochet square with a light gray border. At the bottom right corner of the image is a black circle with text "step by step.". Below the image is text "add a border to a blanket" and "easy to follow with photos and video." Text at the bottom reads "Jessie At Home dot com."

Here are some supplies that you may find useful. You pay the same price with these affiliate links, and then I get a small referral fee.

Furls Odyssey Nickel Crochet Hook
WeCrochet Brava Sport
WeCrochet Retractable Tape Measure

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© Copyright 2022 Jessie Rayot / Jessie At Home All my videos, patterns, charts, photos and posts are my own work, so you may not copy them in any way. If you want to share this information with someone, then share the link to this post. If you want to share on your own blog / website, then you may use the first photo in this post and link back to this post. Also, you may not give away printed copies of this post.

Now that you know how to crochet along an edge, try one of these.

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How To Crochet Along Edge TutorialHow To Crochet Along Edge TutorialHow To Crochet Along Edge TutorialHow To Crochet Along Edge TutorialHow To Crochet Along Edge Tutorial

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